Freighter Passing Under the Anthony Wayne Bridge

Freighter Passing Under the Anthony Wayne Bridge

The Anthony Wayne Bridge, known locally as the “High Level Bridge” was originally built in 1931 and got its nickname because it was the first bridge in Toledo that was high enough for lake freighters and other vessels to pass under without needing a drawbridge or a swing bridge. In 2012, the City of Toledo and the Ohio Department of Transportation announced a redevelopment project for the bridge to keep it functioning into the future.

This exhibit is made possible by visitors like you.  Please consider making a donation to the National Museum of the Great Lakes to help us continue our important work of preserving and making know the history of the Great Lakes.

HERBERT C. JACKSON in Dry Dock, 2020

Herbert C. Jackson in Dry Dock, 2020

In late October of 2020 the M/V Herbert C. Jackson experienced a propulsion issue and was towed from the River Rouge in Michigan to Toledo for repairs at the Toledo Shipyard. Owned by the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, the yard has been run by Ironhead Marine since 2006 and is the only dry dock for freighters on Lake Erie.

The Herbert C. Jackson was built at the Great Lakes Engineering Works, in Ecorse, Michigan in 1959 for the Interlake Steamship Company. The vessel was converted to oil in 1974 and made a self-unloader in 1975. In 2014-205 the vessel was re-powered.

Then

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USCGC ALDER, September 2015

USCGC Alder, September 2015

The US Coast Guard Cutter Alder visited Toledo in September of 2015, docking near the Maritime Academy of Toledo. The USCGC Alder is a 225’ multi-mission buoy tender that has it’s homeport in Duluth, MN, but works across the Great Lakes. The US Coast Guard maintains a presence in the Port of Toledo and works in servicing aids to navigation, search and rescue, maritime law enforcement, homeland security, ice rescue, recreational boating safety, military readiness, and environmental response.

Then

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Port of Toledo Railroad, 2010

Port of Toledo Railroad

The relationship between rail and water transportation is as strong as ever. In 2011, Midwest Terminals updated the tracks in their facilities by replacing 12,000 feet of rail and building 5,000 new feet of rail. Currently they have 17,000 feet of rail at the facility.

Then

This exhibit is made possible by visitors like you.  Please consider making a donation to the National Museum of the Great Lakes to help us continue our important work of preserving and making know the history of the Great Lakes.

Toledo Harbor Lighthouse, 2018

Toledo Harbor Lighthouse, 2018

In 1966 the Toledo Harbor Lighthouse was automated by the US Coast Guard, effectively ending the era of live-in lighthouse keepers. Further changes came in 1985 when the original lens was replaced with a smaller more efficient lens. In 1995, the original lens was removed to be placed on display and is currently at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Nature Center at Maumee Bay State Park.

The US Coast Guard continues to manage the light, but the lighthouse is now owned by the Toledo Lighthouse Preservation Society. In 2020, through a combination of private donations and grants, the society was able to begin restoring the lighthouse.

Then

This exhibit is made possible by visitors like you.  Please consider making a donation to the National Museum of the Great Lakes to help us continue our important work of preserving and making know the history of the Great Lakes.

ST. CLAIR Fire in Layup

St. Clair Fire in Layup 

On February 16, 2019, while in winter layup in Toledo, the St. Clair, a 762 foot lake freighter caught fire. Local firefighters fought the blaze, which burned for 36 hours. The estimated damage to the vessel was $150 million. Fire has always been a concern for lakers, both sailing and in layup. The Toledo Fire and Rescue Department trains to fight fires on these lake freighters.

Then

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Downtown Toledo, 2020

Downtown Toledo, 2020

Over the years, the Toledo skyline has had many changes, but also a few constants. The Water Street Station was constructed in 1896, primarily to provide electricity to Toledo’s street cars, but also arc lights, buildings and residences. The station grew and evolved over the years, eventually becoming the Toledo Edison Steam Plant and providing steam heat to downtown buildings until 1985. It is now the headquarters for ProMedica health system, but retains it’s traditional visual impact on the Toledo skyline.

Over the years, many of the dockside warehouses and terminals have made way for office buildings, like Fifth Third Bank’s northwest Ohio headquarters, hotels, like the Renaissance Toledo Downtown Hotel, attractions, like Imagination Station Toledo, and parks, like Promenade Park.

Then

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The Andersons Grain Elevator, 2018

The Andersons Grain Elevator

After the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway, in 1960 the Andersons opened this loading facility to capitalize on the increased access of “salties” to the Great Lakes and the increased ability to ship grain overseas. Grain continues to be one of the largest exports for the Port of Toledo.

Then

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Toledo Terminal Lower Maumee River Swing Bridge, 2015

Toledo Terminal Lower Maumee River Swing Bridge, 2015

The Toledo Terminal Lower Maumee River Swing Bridge, photographed here from the US Brig Niagara was built between 1901 and 1903. Unlike its counterpart, the Upper Maumee River Swing Bridge, it remains an active railroad bridge for CSX. Trains crossing the railroad bridges have priority over vessel traffic, so boats of all sizes have to coordinate with the railways when sailing up the Maumee River.

Then

This exhibit is made possible by visitors like you.  Please consider making a donation to the National Museum of the Great Lakes to help us continue our important work of preserving and making know the history of the Great Lakes.

Toledo Shipyard

Toledo Shipyard

The Algosea is in drydock at the Toledo Shipyard run by Ironhead Marine.  The Toledo Shipyard was left unused for sometime after American Shipbuilding pulled out of town in 1985.  Owned by the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, the yard has been run by Ironhead Marine since 2006 and is the only dry dock for freighters on Lake Erie.

Then

This exhibit is made possible by visitors like you.  Please consider making a donation to the National Museum of the Great Lakes to help us continue our important work of preserving and making know the history of the Great Lakes.